Emory University, a top-ranked private institution recognized internationally for its outstanding liberal arts colleges, graduate and professional schools, and one of the world’s leading healthcare systems, is located on a beautiful campus in Atlanta, Georgia’s historic Druid Hills neighborhood. Emory maintains an uncommon balance for an institution of its standing: its scholars and experts generate $628 million in research funding annually while also maintaining a traditional emphasis on teaching. The University is enriched by collaboration among its nine schools and colleges, centers, and partners, as well as by the legacy and energy of Atlanta.

The Position

Position Description

Reporting to the assistant vice president of Campus Life, the Director of the Office for RACE is responsible for leading and directing achievement of the Office’s mission through the development and assessment of measurable goals and strategic visioning. A member of Campus Life’s senior staff, the director of RACE collaborates with colleagues across the university to promote a healthy, socially just, ethically engaged, and inclusive community of citizens poised with the skills necessary to transform their communities and the world.

The Office for RACE is part of the Campus Life Portfolio that includes the following:

  • Belonging and Community Justice
    • Center for Women
    • Office of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Life
    • Office for Racial and Cultural Engagement (RACE)
  • Barkley Forum for Debate, Deliberation, and Dialogue
  • Social Justice Education

The Office for RACE is an important part of the Belonging and Community Justice (BCJ) collaborative, which aims to help students find places where they feel they belong and support them in making change in their communities. The Center for Women, Office of LGBT Life, and Office for Racial and Cultural Engagement create intersectional opportunities to learn, engage, and find community as it relates to race, gender, sexuality, and more. While they are three offices, there is a singular goal to support students in their exploration of all of their identities. The directors of these three offices often work in partnership to address dynamic and complex student needs.

Reporting to the assistant vice president of Campus Life, the director of the Office for Racial and Cultural Engagement will:

  • Serve as a member of the Campus Life senior staff, collaborating with Campus Life’s executive leadership in developing strategies and accomplishing objectives related to Emory’s new strategic framework, One Emory: Engaged for Impact.
  • Collaborate on new initiatives including transforming the undergraduate experience, enhancing support for graduate and professional students, and increasing faculty engagement in student life.
  • Provide leadership for RACE’s strategic visioning and plan that supports the achievement of the office’s mission. Works with the team to develop measurable objectives to achieve goals.
  • Serve to address racial injustice and advocate with students of historically marginalized and/or underrepresented racial and ethnic identities.
  • Provide expertise and contribute to the ideas of and initiatives within Belonging and Community Justice in collaboration with colleagues in the Office of LGBT Life and the Center for Women.
  • Support the development of programs and services that encourage belonging and community for students from historically marginalized and/or underrepresented racial and ethnic identities.
  • Provide one-on-one developmental support of students.
  • Direct planning, implementation, and assessment of RACE’s programs.
  • Hire, train, manage, and evaluate two full-time professionals and several graduate and undergraduate student staff members.
  • Plan, administer, and monitor organizational
  • Develop and manage fundraising efforts from alumni, foundation, corporate, and governmental donors in coordination with the Emory Campus Life’s director of development.
  • Manage the RACE advisory committee and develop working relationships with student organizations, alumni, academic departments, Emory Campus Life (ECL) colleagues, and community partners.
  • Provide leadership and supervision for the Commission on Racial and Social Justice (CRSJ) internship program and student interns.
  • Formally and informally advise student organizations as appropriate.
  • Collaborate with and seek the support of representatives from other student, faculty, staff, departmental, and alumni organizations, including the Emory Alumni
  • Establish and administer policies and procedures within the Office for RACE.
  • Participate in campus responses to events impacting inclusion, diversity, belonging, and equity at Emory or at large.
  • Represent RACE and ECL in various campus, community, state, and national

Qualifications

A master’s degree and a minimum of five years of documented professional experience are required. The successful candidate will possess a strong and demonstrated commitment to racial and social justice, equity, and intersectionality. A doctoral degree and record of scholarship relating to racial and social justice, equity, and intersectionality, coupled with six or more years of related professional experience are preferred. In addition, the following skills and experience will be expected of the new Director of the Office for RACE:

  • effective written and oral communication skills, including considerable experience in public speaking and presenting to diverse communities;
  • seasoned leadership ability and facility to build capacity among staff and students in the problem-solving process of developing community while also engaging others about, and across their differences;
  • extensive experience leading, shaping, and assessing programs and services that foster belonging and community for students from historically marginalized and/or oppressed racial identities;
  • evidence of successful supervision and team management; and
  • the ability to promote excellent interpersonal relationships and to work collaboratively with diverse groups of students, staff, faculty, administrators, and community leaders.

Likely Opportunities, Priorities, and Challenges of the Position

While the Office of Multicultural Programs and Services (OMPS) had over 30 years of program history and identity, the newer Office for RACE is still in the early stages of creating a cogent voice that balances student identity programming with the creation of active learning environments that enhance awareness and exploration of why and how race informs cultural and communal development. It will be a priority for the next director to embark on a compassionate listening tour that provides opportunities for students, including graduate students and particularly those from marginalized student populations, to share experiences to best support their ability to co-create opportunities for programs and space. With creativity and intentionality, the director will have an opportunity to craft a comprehensive office marketing outreach plan that illustrates to students and community members the dynamic programs and services available.

Additional areas of focus for the next director:

  • Collaborative Leadership: The director of the Office for RACE must be seen as a strong campus partner and collaborative thinker. Alongside a new University Diversity Officer and colleagues within Belonging Community Justice, it will be important for the new director to see the inherent intersectionality of RACE’s mission campus wide.
  • Engage Atlanta and beyond: Emory alumni who have a strong connection to the programs and services from the Office for RACE are eager to stay connected to campus life and can provide additional mentorship and strategic support to students. Additionally, there is a desire to build strategic community partnerships in the culturally rich Atlanta area to support educational engagement around race and equity.
  • Tell the story: With the One Emory strategic imperative as a guideline, The Office for RACE is poised to showcase how programs contribute to Emory student success, engagement, and persistence.

History of the Position

Today’s Office for Racial and Cultural Engagement (RACE) first opened its doors in 1979 as the Office of Minority Student Programs and later became the Office of Multicultural Programs and Services (OMPS). OMPS played an instrumental role in helping Emory address changing dynamics and demographics on the Emory campus. In 2017, after a comprehensive external peer review and a commissioned Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education campus study, the OMPS to RACE transition team was initiated. The team curated a report outlining a new departmental vision, mission statement, and departmental name. While OMPS’ primary focus was celebrating cultural diversity, the Office for Racial and Cultural Engagement is driven by an enduring commitment to building inclusive and racially just communities through the courageous inquiry of the nature of race and its impact on individual, cultural, and communal development. The mission of the Office is to support a sense of belonging for students from historically marginalized and/or underrepresented racial and ethnic identities.  In addition, the Office is charged with encouraging and challenging  all Emory students, including majority students, to inquire about the construction of racial identities and create active learning environments that enhance their awareness and exploration of why and how race informs cultural and communal development.

Institution & Location

Institutional Background

Emory University, a top-ranked private institution recognized internationally for its outstanding liberal arts colleges, graduate and professional schools, and one of the world’s leading healthcare systems, is located on a beautiful campus in Atlanta, Georgia, home of the Civil Rights Movement.

Emory maintains an uncommon balance for an institution of its standing: scholars and experts generate $628 million in research funding annually while also maintaining a traditional emphasis on teaching. The University is enriched by collaboration among its schools, centers, and partners, as well as by its deep engagement with the diverse and dynamic city of Atlanta.

The 2017 Annual Report details the difference Emory makes in the classroom, in the clinic, in Atlanta, and in the world with robust sections that include seven key areas: Creating Knowledge, Educating the Next Generation, Caring and Healing, Transforming Society, Global Impact, Emory in Atlanta, and University Milestones.

With approximately 15,000 students, including 8,000 undergraduates and 7,000 graduate and professional students, Emory draws students from every state and more than 100 countries. More than 70 percent of students receive financial aid.

 

Emory’s Earliest Years

The Methodist Episcopal Church founded Emory College in 1836 in the small Georgia town of Oxford. The founders named the town for the school’s prestigious British cousin, and named the school for a bishop who dreamed of an American education that molded character as well as the mind.

The little school struggled for decades and finally began to prosper in the late 1800s. By 1914, the Methodist Church was looking to create a university in the South, and Emory College was looking to expand.

Asa Candler, founder of The Coca-Cola Company, wrote the “million-dollar letter” to offer seed money, and he sweetened the deal by donating land in Atlanta. Emory University received a DeKalb County charter to build at its present location in 1915. The soft drink company president’s brother was Emory alumnus and former president, Methodist Bishop Warren Candler, who returned to serve as its first chancellor on the new campus.

Emory has a rich, and often troubled racial and ethnic history. Antebellum presidents, faculty, and trustees of Emory College owned slaves, and many of the school’s leaders marshaled theological and political arguments against abolition and played prominent and decisive roles in the schism of the Methodist Episcopal Church over the issue of slavery.

Over many decades, Emory’s moral stance evolved, and in the 1960s, Emory played a key role in Southern integration when it sued the state and won a landmark Georgia Supreme Court case that allowed Emory the legal right to integrate. Through its Methodist connections, Emory developed strong connections with other countries–particularly in Asia–early on, and Emory’s first international student, Korean Yun Ch’i-Ho, graduated in 1893. Yun’s diaries provide a fascinating perspective on Jim Crow and the South’s black/white racial dichotomy.

More recently Emory, like many institutions, has endeavored to support student activists associated with the Black Lives Matter movement as well as our DACA and undocumented students.

Institutional Leadership

Claire E. Sterk, President

Claire E. Sterk is the 20th president of Emory University and the Charles Howard Candler Professor of Public Health. She began her role as president on September 1, 2016. A pioneering public health scholar, Sterk has served for the past two decades as a social scientist, academic leader, and administrator at Emory. Prior to becoming president, she was the university’s sixth provost and executive vice president for academic affairs.

Sterk is a globally renowned thought leader who has deepened our understanding of social and health disparities; addiction and infectious diseases, specifically HIV/AIDS; community engagement; and the importance of mentoring and empowering women leaders. She has held numerous leadership positions in professional organizations. Her academic publications include three books and more than 125 peer-reviewed articles. Her work is widely cited and she has received more than $30 million in external research funding. Professor Kirk Elifson, to whom she is married, is a key research partner; together they have lectured widely at universities around the world.

Both in her role as president and in her previous role as provost, Sterk has emphasized the choices and responsibilities of research universities and their real-world impact. She is a strong advocate for increased access and inclusion, and she is known for championing collaboration and innovation within the academy as well as through global external engagement—including at the local level.

A native of the Netherlands, Sterk earned her PhD in sociology from Erasmus University in Rotterdam and a doctorandus degree in medical anthropology from the University of Utrecht. She completed her undergraduate education at the Free University in Amsterdam.

Dona Yarbrough, Assistant Vice President of Campus Life

As assistant vice president of Campus Life, Dona Yarbrough leads faculty and academic engagement and graduate/professional student initiatives for Campus Life, the Office of the Student Ombudsperson, Learning and Development for staff, Social Justice Education, and the Barkley Forum. Yarbrough is also responsible for the Center for Women, Racial and Cultural Engagement (RACE), and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Life.

Yarbrough has held several positions since joining Emory in 2008, including associate vice provost of community and diversity and director of the Center for Women. Earlier in her career, she was director of the LGBT Center and a part-time faculty member in women’s studies at Tufts University. Her teaching and scholarship have focused on gender, race, and sexuality studies; early 20th century American literature; and diversity, inclusion, and equity in higher education. Yarbrough received her PhD in English from the University of Virginia.

Benefits Overview

Emory University benefits include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Medical, Dental and Vision Plans
  • Flexible Spending Accounts
  • Health Savings Account
  • Life Insurance
  • Long- and Short-term Disability Plans
  • Home and Auto Insurance
  • Retirement Plans
  • Educational Benefits
  • Work life Benefits such as Adoption Reimbursement

For a detailed look at Emory University’s benefits, visit the website at http://www.hr.emory.edu/eu/benefits/index.html

Application & Nomination

Review of applications will begin immediately, and continue until the position is filled. To apply for this position please click on the Apply button, complete the brief application process, and upload your resume and position-specific cover letter. Applicants must also submit application materials via the Emory University website at http://www.hr.emory.edu/eu/careers/. Nominations for this position may be emailed to Anne-Marie Kenney at amk@spelmanjohnson.com. Applicants needing reasonable accommodation to participate in the application process should contact Spelman Johnson at 413-529-2895.

Visit the Emory University website at www.emory.edu

Emory University is an equal opportunity/equal access/affirmative action employer fully committed to achieving a diverse workforce and complies with all applicable Federal and Georgia State laws, regulations, and executive orders regarding nondiscrimination and affirmative action in its programs and activities. Emory University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, ethnic or national origin, gender, genetic information, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, and veteran’s status.