THE OPPORTUNITY

Barnard College, one of the most prestigious institutions of higher education in the United States, invites inquiries, nominations, and applications for the inaugural position of vice president for diversity, equity, and inclusion, the College’s chief diversity officer (vice president). This is an outstanding opportunity for a talented and experienced individual whose education, perspectives, and personal and professional experiences will provide a foundation for effective and collaborative leadership of the College’s efforts to translate the ideals and goals of diversity, equity, and inclusion into substantive and transformative policies and practices across the College community.

Barnard provides a singular educational experience: a world-renowned college for women with the academic resources of Columbia University and the experience of New York City as an extended classroom. Founded in 1889, Barnard was one of the few colleges in the nation where women could receive the same rigorous and challenging education available to men. Today, with an admission rate of 13.9 percent, Barnard is one of the most selective academic institutions in the country and remains devoted to empowering extraordinary women in the 21st century. The College graduates formidable students of imagination, ambition, and ability. Its eighth president, Dr. Sian Leah Beilock, joined the College in 2017. Under her leadership, Barnard provides an energized, integrated, and transformative learning environment.

Barnard aspires to be a leader among colleges and universities as a place where differing histories, experiences, and identities are understood and celebrated; where the ties that bind everyone together as a community are strong; where the ideals of inclusive excellence are wholly embraced; where discourse about issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion is engaged in a thoughtful and respectful manner, with an orientation toward social justice; and where robust and mutually beneficial partnerships are cultivated with diverse communities throughout New York City and beyond.

This position offers the right individual a truly unique and exciting opportunity. The vice president will serve as an important colleague and partner on the president’s senior team; create and lead Barnard’s office of diversity, equity, and inclusion; develop and implement an overarching plan for inclusive excellence and increased equity; serve as a well-connected campus-partner; lead cross-functional teams in a collaborative environment; and understand and improve the campus climate. The vice president will also reimagine and oversee how Barnard incorporates community engagement by initiating and continuing conversations and programming between the College and its community partners. The ideal candidate will be a visionary and transformative leader, as well as an accomplished strategist, administrator, and community builder who has significant experience and a track record of successfully advancing diversity, equity, inclusion, and positive change in complex communities and/or mission-driven organizations with the ability to work within the stimulating academic environment of a top-tier institution of higher education.

The Position

ROLE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND INCLUSION

Reporting to President Sian Leah Beilock, the vice president for diversity, equity, and inclusion will be a valued member of Barnard’s senior staff. While Barnard currently has resources and structures for diversity, equity, and inclusion for students, faculty, and staff, there is no role at the most senior level of the College with the responsibility for driving the institutional change necessary to realize Barnard’s aspirations. The vice president will have the opportunity to shape the work, initiatives, and goals necessary to bring about the institutional change desired by the College to create a more inclusive environment and to continue building greater diversity in its community. The initial work will involve taking the time to understand Barnard, the work currently being done, and the challenges and many opportunities facing the institution. The role will then shift to working across the College to determine areas of focus, articulate specific goals, and marshal the resources needed to achieve these goals.

The vice president will create and lead Barnard’s office of diversity, equity, and inclusion; provide strategic and visionary leadership in promoting an institutional culture that values diversity and supports inclusive excellence; partner with campus leaders, students, faculty, staff, and external constituencies to create and facilitate transformation of the College’s culture, institutions, and practices; proactively develop and implement policy, plans, programs, and activities that both educate and promote diversity, equity, and inclusion as core values of the College; and lead Barnard’s efforts in realizing its bold ambition to become a national model for inclusive excellence and community engagement.

The vice president will chair the College’s Council on Diversity and Inclusion, which was established in 2017. Their stated goals are to expand the dialogue around diversity, equity, and inclusion to the entire Barnard community of students, faculty, staff, and alumnae; promote and coordinate a campus-wide diversity, equity, and inclusion agenda; manage and monitor the implementation of the March 2017 recommendations of the President’s Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion; and advise Barnard’s senior leadership and Board of Trustees on implementing best practices in the promotion of new initiatives that create a more diverse and inclusive campus community.

The vice president will convene a cabinet to identify policies, structures, and practices that support the recruitment, retention, and success of diverse faculty, administrators, staff, and students. The vice president will work collaboratively with the cabinet to establish systems of accountability and evaluation, including the continuous monitoring and improvement of institutional diversity, equity, and inclusion goals, using data-driven metrics to measure success and disseminate information. This cabinet will consist of all diversity, equity, and inclusion coordinators across campus, including but not limited to the dean of faculty diversity and development, the associate dean of student life, the executive director for equity, the associate dean for Beyond Barnard, the associate dean for student success, the director of the Center for Engaged Pedagogy, the College ombuds office, and a representative from Human Resources.

Finally, because Barnard contributes to and benefits from the diversity of perspectives, experiences, and resources that follow from robust exchanges with the broader community and the environs of New York City, the vice president will be responsible for reimagining and overseeing the College’s community engagement initiatives. The vice president will establish the College as a locus of community-engaged scholarship and practice through robust partnerships with local communities, neighborhood, and citywide organizations, and the City of New York, as well as through innovative programs on- and off-campus. The vice president will work with faculty to develop and strengthen programs that extend research, teaching, service, and learning beyond the campus, encouraging collaboration between students and neighbors, and establishing Barnard as not only in the City of New York, but of the City of New York.

HISTORY OF THE POSITION

Barnard’s core mission is to rigorously educate and empower women, providing them with the ability to think, analyze, and engage effectively in the world. The success of the College’s mission depends on creating and fostering a diverse, inclusive, and equitable community. Barnard’s leadership understands that academic excellence is impossible without the unique perspectives, ideas, approaches, and contributions that come from having the broadest diversity of students, faculty, and staff across the College.

In February 2017, after a year of discussion, consultation, and analysis of historical and more recent data and reports, the President’s Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion identified three broad objectives (structural changes, community-building and climate, and assessment and accountability) and ten specific proposals that have the potential to transform the College into a more representative, inclusive, and equitable campus. The first proposal in the structural changes category called for creating a chief diversity officer (CDO) position with a campus-wide and community-focused mandate. The vice president for diversity, equity, and inclusion is a new position that was created in response to that proposal.

As a new senior-level executive reporting directly to the president, the vice president will serve as Barnard’s CDO who will prioritize and focus on diversity and inclusion initiatives and institutional continuity over time; re-conceptualize diversity and inclusion as a strength and a priority; institute a leadership and accountability structure for Barnard’s diversity mission; and provide necessary expertise in managing change relative to diversity, equity, and inclusion. The vice president will lead a collaborative team comprised of staff and faculty who are already working on diversity and inclusion across the campus and with community partners. The Council on Diversity and Inclusion, a standing committee appointed by the president and comprised of students, faculty, staff, alumnae, and trustees, will serve in an advisory capacity to the vice president and help set goals and develop programs that promote the College’s mission to be the most diverse, inclusive, and equitable community possible.

With assistance from Spelman Johnson, Barnard plans to conduct an aggressive nationwide search for this inaugural position. The successful candidate will be expected to take office on or about July 1, 2019.

OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES

The vice president for diversity, equity, and inclusion will be expected to address the following opportunities and challenges:

Serve as an important colleague and partner on the senior team

Barnard currently has a distributed model for advancing diversity, equity, and inclusion. The successful candidate will report directly to the president, join the senior leadership team, contribute to the College’s strategic decisions, and earn the trust and respect of colleagues across the campus community. In collaboration with colleagues on the president’s cabinet, the vice president will ensure that inclusive excellence is interwoven throughout Barnard’s policies and strategic initiatives as a core value of the college. The vice president will be expected to pose challenging questions and suggest insightful solutions on difficult topics in order to stimulate the very best thinking among Barnard’s leadership.

Create and lead Barnard’s office of diversity, equity, and inclusion

The vice president will have an opportunity to create and lead an office of diversity, equity, and inclusion that will serve as an organizational hub for inclusive excellence and as a place to consolidate, support, communicate, and guide Barnard’s framework and efforts for diversity, inclusion, and equity. The office will have a visible and accessible presence on campus as a resource to the community. The office will focus on systemic change in support of equitable and inclusive learning and community spaces to support the flourishing of Barnard’s students, faculty, staff, alumnae, and community partners.

Develop and implement overarching plan for inclusive excellence

Barnard recognizes that academic excellence is impossible without the perspectives, ideas, approaches, and contributions that come from having the broadest diversity of students, faculty, and staff across the College. The vice president will work with members of Barnard’s community to develop and implement an overarching plan to support diversity, equity, and inclusion in the pursuit of academic excellence. The successful candidate will promote an understanding in the campus community and its offices of how their daily work connects back to diversity in meaningful and measurable ways. This entails, for example, formulating policy, evaluating progress, identifying opportunities, and locating areas of concern across the campus.

Serve as collaborative campus-partner with relationships across the College community

The work of the vice president for diversity, equity, and inclusion will be accomplished through influence and the strength of relationships, as well as the formal authorities of the role. To succeed in this environment, the vice president must be a superb communicator and relationship-builder who generates support for the work of the office of diversity, equity, and inclusion by developing strong partnerships across the College with student leaders, faculty, staff, and administrators. Earning the confidence and respect of the College community, the vice president will serve as a visible and accessible presence on campus.

Lead cross-functional teams in a constructive environment

The vice president will chair the Council on Diversity and Inclusion, a standing committee appointed by the president and comprised of students, faculty, staff, alumnae, and trustees who are responsible for setting goals and developing programs that promote the College’s dedication to be the most diverse, inclusive, and equitable community possible. The vice president will also convene a cabinet that consists of all diversity, equity, and inclusion coordinators across campus to advance inclusive excellence, establish systems of accountability and evaluation, and use data-driven metrics to measure success, disseminate information, and locate opportunities for improvement. The vice president will use this information to determine what resources are needed so that diversity is embraced and championed throughout the institution—from administrative and academic leaders to faculty, staff, and students.

Understand and improve the campus climate

The vice president will generate ideas and initiatives for assessing, understanding, and improving the campus climate. To this end, this individual will develop or use tools and surveys to gauge the campus climate and the effectiveness of initiatives to create a more inclusive community. The vice president will partner with Institutional Research to collect, interpret and disseminate data related to the campus climate to educate the Barnard community on critical issues.

Reimagine and oversee Barnard’s plan for community engagement

The vice president will be responsible for reimagining and overseeing the College’s community engagement initiatives and for working collaboratively with community partners in the diverse communities that Barnard serves. The vice president will establish Barnard as a locus of community engaged scholarship and practice through robust partnerships with local communities, neighborhood, citywide organizations, and the City of New York, as well as innovative programs on- and off-campus. The vice president will work with faculty to develop and strengthen programs that extend research, teaching, service, and learning beyond the campus, encouraging collaboration between students and neighbors, and establishing Barnard as not only in the City of New York, but of the City of New York. Using the College’s position in New York City as a springboard, the vice president will be able to build an innovative model of community engagement that can advance Barnard as a leader in this area.

MEASURES OF SUCCESS

Measures of success for the vice president for diversity, equity, and inclusion are currently seen as including:

  • creation of a strategic vision and executable, adaptable plan to incorporate diversity, equity, and inclusion into the culture and operations of Barnard;
  • establishment of the office of diversity, equity, and inclusion;
  • improved communication and collaboration across the Barnard community in areas of diversity, equity, and inclusion; and
  • effective planning and strategizing about community engagement as an integral and vital part of Barnard’s vision for diversity, equity, and inclusion, as well as our core values.

The vice president will ultimately work with President Beilock to determine measures of success and their respective timetables.

QUALIFICATIONS AND CHARACTERISTICS

Barnard seeks candidates whose education, perspectives, and personal and professional experiences have together prepared them to serve as an effective and collaborative leader of the College’s efforts to create a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive environment. The ideal candidate will be a visionary and transformative leader, as well as an accomplished strategist, administrator, and community builder who has significant experience and a track record of successfully advancing diversity, inclusion, and positive change in complex communities and/or mission-driven organizations with the ability to work within the stimulating academic environment of a top-tier institution of higher education. This person will be adept at fostering dialogue with different groups across and beyond the campus; building coalitions and consensus; and achieving results through influence, intellect, and dynamism of personality. The successful candidate will have a deep and intersectional understanding of the dynamics of difference, privilege, and power, and possess the energy, enthusiasm, drive, emotional intelligence, and gravitas necessary to achieve ambitious goals.

While no single candidate will likely have all the ideal qualifications, candidates should possess many of the following qualifications and characteristics:

  • A record of imaginative and verifiable success that will inspire and earn the confidence of all College constituents.
  • A proven ability to serve as a senior officer and be a forward-thinking problem-solver who efficiently evaluates risk and continually anticipates opportunities.
  • Success as an intellectual leader and catalyst on diversity.
  • Excellent interpersonal and public communication skills, including effective messaging to multiple and diverse audiences, internally and externally-facing, in a number of manners, including oral presentation, written communication, and digital communications.
  • Experience guiding the implementation of an overarching plan for inclusive excellence and increased equity, establishing metrics, measuring progress, and adapting as necessary.
  • A complex intersectional comprehension of identity and inequality, with a fundamental capacity to listen with empathy to all perspectives and experiences.
  • A demonstrated ability to navigate complex organizational environments.
  • The ability to inspire and lead teams of faculty, staff, students, alumnae, trustees, and community partners who often have competing priorities and demands.
  • The ability to negotiate effectively, well-practiced in the arts of conflict resolution.
  • The ability to develop and manage budgets, as well as experience soliciting and securing external funding to advance strategic initiatives.
  • The ability to be a collaborator and a convener; to work with judiciousness and diplomacy; and the capacity to build bridges and consensus.
  • The ability to anticipate and address challenges to inclusion and diversity rather than simply reacting to them or fixing problems.
  • A person rich in gravitas and brilliant in the ability to gently and assertively wield influence.
  • The ability to maintain the highest standards of ethics and integrity.
  • The ability to create an atmosphere of positivity and mutual respect.
  • An advanced degree and experience with leadership in a mission-driven organization, preferably in, but not limited to, higher education.

Institution & Location

BARNARD COLLEGE: AN OVERVIEW

Since its founding in 1889, Barnard has been a distinguished leader in higher education, offering a rigorous liberal arts foundation to young women whose curiosity, drive, and exuberance set them apart. Ours is a diverse intellectual community in a unique learning environment that provides the best of all worlds: small, intimate classes in a collaborative liberal arts setting dedicated to the advancement of women with the vast academic resources of Columbia University just steps away—in the heart of vibrant and electric New York City.

On our leafy four-acre campus on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, our world-class faculty of teacher-scholars educates more than 2,500 inspired and intrepid undergraduate students, who, as a matter of course, go on to achieve great things. Throughout our history, Barnard graduates have made their mark as leaders in the arts, business, government, and science, and as activists for gender, economic, and social justice, as well as civil and human rights issues more broadly.

Over one hundred and twenty-five years ago, Barnard was the first college in New York City—and one of the few in the world—where women could receive the same liberal arts education available to men. Today, Barnard is one of the most selective academic institutions in the United States and remains devoted to empowering extraordinary students. With the unparalleled opportunities of our cosmopolitan setting, the strength of our academic programs, and our ongoing commitment to diversity as a transformative project of social justice and equality, we continue to do what we have done from the beginning with a keen eye to the future.

Barnard changes the world and the way we think about it.

Relationship with Columbia University

Barnard is an independent institution with its own policies, endowment, and trustees. Our singular agreement with Columbia University means:

  • Barnard is one of Columbia University’s four undergraduate colleges.
  • Barnard and Columbia undergraduate students cross-register in courses at both institutions.
  • Students receive a diploma from both Barnard and Columbia.
  • Barnard’s faculty (scholars dedicated to teaching) receive tenure at both Barnard College and Columbia University.
  • Barnard houses the undergraduate majors in Architecture, Dance, Theatre, Urban Studies, and the Education Program for the entire university.
  • Barnard is the only women’s college—and one of only a few liberal arts colleges—to offer NCAA Division I athletics through the Columbia-Barnard Athletic Consortium.

New York City

Enter the College gates at 117th and Broadway and a green and intimate campus in the heart of New York City awaits. Here, within the space of four acres, Barnard students find a true sense of community.

The neighborhood of Morningside Heights also includes Columbia University, with Teachers College, Manhattan School of Music, Union Theological Seminary, Bank Street College of Education, and The Jewish Theological Seminary all nearby. Harlem, with its vibrant culture and rich history and tradition, is only a few blocks north of the campus. The city is an education in itself, and its diversity is at the core of Barnard’s identity. The College’s students and faculty use the city to extend the classroom for research, coursework, studio visits, field trips, internships, jobs, and endless inspiration. Barnard is a subway-ride away from Chinatown, Greenwich Village, or Wall Street; MoMA, the High Line, or Carnegie Hall; and Central Park, the museums, the other boroughs, or any of the 24,000 restaurants that represent New York as a capital of cosmopolitanism.

Mission Statement

A Barnard Education

For over 125 years, Barnard has embraced and enhanced its original mission—to thrive on the highest academic standards, to promote intellectual risk-taking and curiosity, to foster resilience, agility and creativity, to strive for diversity and inclusiveness in all its endeavors, and to prepare our graduates to flourish in the world.

Barnard College aims to provide the highest quality liberal arts education to promising and high-achieving students, offering the unparalleled advantages of an outstanding residential college in partnership with a major research university. With a dedicated faculty of scholars distinguished in their respective fields, Barnard is a community of accessible teachers and engaged students who participate together in intellectual risk-taking and discovery. Barnard students develop the intellectual resources to take advantage of opportunities as new fields, new ideas, and new technologies emerge. They graduate prepared to lead lives that are professionally satisfying and successful, personally fulfilling, and enriched by love of learning.

As a college for women, Barnard embraces its responsibility to address issues of gender in all of their complexity and urgency, and to help students achieve the personal strength that will enable them to meet the challenges they will encounter throughout their lives. Located in the cosmopolitan urban environment of New York City, and committed to diversity in its student body, faculty and staff, Barnard prepares its graduates to flourish in different cultural surroundings in an increasingly inter-connected world.

The Barnard community thrives on high expectations. By setting rigorous academic standards and giving students the support they need to meet those standards, Barnard enables them to discover their own capabilities. Living and learning in this unique environment, Barnard students become agile, resilient, responsible, and creative, prepared to lead and serve their society.

 

Leadership

Sian Leah Beilock, President

On July 1, 2017, Sian Leah Beilock became the eighth president of Barnard College. Prior to her appointment as president, Beilock spent twelve years at the University of Chicago. As the Stella M. Rowley Professor of Psychology and a member of the Committee on Education, she specialized in how children and adults learn and perform at their best, especially under stress. In her role as a member of the senior leadership, she served as the vice provost for academic initiatives, and as the executive vice provost and as an officer of the University.

In her research, Beilock focuses specifically on success in math and science for women and girls, and how performance anxiety can either be exacerbated or alleviated by teachers, parents, and peers. She explores the brain and body factors that influence skill learning and performance, as well as how simple psychological strategies can be used to ensure success in high-stakes situations ranging from test-taking and public speaking to athletics. She works extensively with educators and those involved in public policy, including serving on a National Research Council committee on decision-making and stress.

While in the Provost’s Office at the University of Chicago, Beilock created and launched UChicagoGRAD, a university-wide office and initiative designed to ensure that Chicago’s graduate students and postdocs develop the necessary skills—from writing and communication to advanced pedagogy—to be leaders in academia, government, industry and the nonprofit sector. She led UChicago Urban, the University of Chicago’s integrative efforts to bridge urban scholarship, practice, and engagement. Beilock was also responsible for academic centers including the University Libraries and the University of Chicago Press, academic space planning and allocation, and the development and implementation of several major building projects.

Beilock won the 2017 Troland Award from the National Academy of Sciences. In addition, she is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Psychological Association, and a member of the National Academy of Kinesiology. Early in her career, she received awards from the Association for Psychological Science, American Psychological Foundation, the Psychonomic Society, and the Society of Experimental Psychologists.

President Beilock is the author of two books that have been published in over a dozen languages—the critically acclaimed Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal about Getting It Right When You Have To (2010) and How the Body Knows Its Mind: The Surprising Power of the Physical Environment to Influence How You Think and Feel (2015). She has published more than 100 papers and has received funding from the National Science Foundation (including a CAREER award), the Department of Education, and several foundations.

President Beilock earned her Bachelor of Science in cognitive science from the University of California, San Diego, and doctorates of philosophy in both kinesiology and psychology from Michigan State University. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Chicago, Beilock was an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at Miami University of Ohio.

The following are select areas of focus for President Beilock and the College:

Beyond Barnard

Beyond Barnard supports all students and alumnae as they define, pursue, and achieve success in their careers and communities. The office integrates career resources, graduate and professional school preparation, advising on research and competitive fellowships, access to internships, and student jobs. In their work they foster (1) equity by providing programs and resources for students from all backgrounds, advancing social mobility and fostering inclusive dialogue about opportunity in a wide range of careers; (2) exploration by helping students and alumnae navigate diverse pathways to meaningful work that are open to them regardless of their chosen major; (3) engagement via facilitating productive connections among students, faculty, staff, alumnae, employers, graduate and professional schools, and external partners; and (4) empowerment through advising, programming, resources, and opportunities for experiential education. Beyond Barnard provides students and alumnae with the tools, skills, and confidence to pursue and achieve success as they define it.

STEM as a central part of the liberal arts

Barnard has long distinguished itself with its eminence in the humanities and social sciences, and there is a renewed focus on acknowledging science and math at the College as a critical part of the liberal arts. Key to this approach are new centers in the Milstein Center for Teaching and Learning that take an interdisciplinary perspective on knowledge acquisition. These centers include the Empirical Reasoning Center, the Digital Humanities Center, the Center for Engaged Pedagogy, and the Vagelos Computational Science Center. Roughly one-third of Barnard’s recent graduates are math and science majors and the College runs a successful Summer Research Institute that places approximately 175 students annually in paid, 10-week summer research positions in labs at Barnard and across the city.

Mental health and wellness

To support students as they navigate balancing rigorous course loads with adulthood, the College is developing a comprehensive mental health and wellness initiative that enhances and expands the programs Barnard currently provide. The College is partnering with organizations such as The Jed Foundation (JED), a non-profit organization that empowers young adults with the skills and support to grow into healthy, thriving adults, particularly through the lens of emotional health and suicide-prevention. This year JED engaged Barnard in a more in-depth assessment, called “JED Campus”, to get a holistic understanding of what the College is currently doing well and what can be improved from a wide range of perspectives.

Social mobility

Ability is much more widespread than opportunity, and the new vice president will be a vital part of the College’s continued commitment to not just educate students from historically underrepresented groups, but also to provide resources to support them at Barnard and beyond. The Equality of Opportunity Project ranks Barnard 12th out of 65 elite colleges and universities in terms of the social mobility of its students: i.e., the likelihood that graduates will move two or more quintiles up the income distribution by age 35. The New York Times College Access Index measures academic diversity at top colleges. Barnard ranked 20th among 171 colleges and universities in 2017. The College’s policy of need-blind admissions is at the core of who Barnard is and supports how it values economic mobility. The associate dean for student success oversees programs and initiatives that are available to all students, while the director of opportunity programs focuses on specific groups of students who participate in formal programs.

Academic Programs and Faculty

Barnard offers an exceptional array of academic programs, with degrees in more than 40 major areas of study. Students are challenged to find new ways to think about themselves, their surroundings, and their roles in changing the world for the better. They study with distinguished faculty who are passionate about undergraduate education and are productive and leading scholars in their fields. Classes are small; the student-faculty ratio is 10:1.

Barnard’s relationship with Columbia permits the two institutions to share some academic programs: architecture, dance, education, theater, and urban studies are led by Barnard, while computer science, statistics, and engineering are centered at Columbia. As would be expected, the institutional arrangement presents special demands with respect to academic advising. Barnard’s students are guided first by pre-major advisors and then major faculty advisors, with class deans providing guidance to students in developing their educational plans and making thoughtful and informed decisions about their goals while at Barnard and beyond.

Barnard is home to approximately 250 full-time faculty members. Consonant with its mission, Barnard strives to recruit, develop, and retain female faculty. Today, more than 60 percent of its faculty is female, as compared to the national average of about 37 percent.

Curriculum

Barnard’s Foundations curriculum is innovative, rigorous, and flexible to keep pace with a rapidly changing world. It emphasizes technology and digital learning; international and global learning; and quantitative and empirical reasoning. Students study the local—our connection with New York City—and the historical, as well as issues of social difference. We are one of a handful of institutions with a distinct technology requirement.

Centers

Departments

  • Africana Studies
  • Anthropology
  • Architecture
  • Art History
  • Asian & Middle Eastern Cultures
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Classics and Ancient Studies
  • Computer Science (CU)
  • Dance
  • Economics
  • English
  • Environmental Science
  • French
  • History
  • Mathematics
  • Philosophy
  • Physical Education
  • Physics & Astronomy
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religion
  • Slavic
  • Sociology
  • Spanish & Latin American Cultures Statistics (CU)
  • Theatre
  • Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies

Programs

  • American Studies
  • Athena Leadership Studies
  • Consortium of Critical Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Comparative Literature
  • Education
  • European Studies
  • Film Studies
  • First-Year Experience

 

  • German
  • Human Rights
  • Italian
  • Jewish Studies
  • Medieval and Renaissance Studies
  • Music
  • Neuroscience & Behavior
  • Reacting to the Past
  • Science & Public Policy
  • Speaking Fellows
  • Urban Studies
  • Writing Fellows

The Student Body

Barnard students are intelligent, confident, and focused. They are notable for their diversity of backgrounds as well as interests; students come to Barnard looking for different experiences and are met with an impressively broad range of educational opportunities both inside and outside the classroom. The College’s compact, four-acre residential campus is a place of beauty and calm, providing an anchor for Barnard students taking advantage of the surrounding area. Three-quarters of all students undertake an internship in the city before graduation.

A life at Barnard is one of active engagement and commitment in a residential learning setting. Most students (over 90 percent) live on campus. The student leadership collective includes the Student Government Association (SGA), The Governing Board at Barnard (GBB), and McIntosh Activities Council (McAc). Student voices are passionate and informed. Students serve with faculty and staff on College committees, helping to shape the curriculum, housing, and College activities. Almost half identify as American Indian, Asian, Black/African-American, Hispanic, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, and/or multiracial. Current students hail from 39 states as well as Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin and Northern Mariana Islands, and from 58 countries. Ten percent of the student body is international; 13 percent self-identify as first-generation college students. Barnard is need-blind in its admissions for U.S. citizens/permanent residents and about 40 percent of Barnard’s students are on financial aid. The College has a six-year graduation rate of 92 percent.

Fall 2018 Enrollment

All students        2,635

Ethnicity and race of domestic students

(Multiple selections; totals will sum to greater than 100%)

  • Native American 2 percent
  • Asian or Asian-American 19 percent
  • Black or African-American 9 percent
  • Hispanic or Latina 12 percent
  • Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander <1 percent
  • White 64 percent
  • Unknown <1 percent
  • Students of color (domestic) 38 percent
  • International 10 percent
  • Countries represented 58
  • Students of color (any citizenship) 45 percent

Barnard’s Staff

There are currently seven major administrative units of the College, each led by a member of the president’s senior staff:

  • Chief Operating Officer: Finance, Campus Services, Information Technology, Human Resources, Institutional Research (jointly with Provost)
  • Communications: Marketing, Barnard Magazine, Media Relations, E-Communications
  • Dean of the College: Student Services, Dean of Studies, Primary Health Services, Equity & Title IX
  • Development: Alumnae Relations, Major Gifts, Annual Fund, Corporate & Foundation Relations
  • Enrollment: Admissions, Financial Aid, Pre-College Programs*
  • Legal Affairs: General Counsel
  • Provost: Academic centers & departments, International & Global Strategy, Library

Additionally, the President’s Office is the administrative unit relating to the Board of Trustees.

Total staffing of regularly employed staff in these administrative units represents 580 budgeted lines, approximately 555 full time equivalents [FTE] and vacancies that are comprised of 5 employee classifications:

  • 306 exempt administrators
  • 2 confidential staff persons
  • 157 non-exempt UAW Local 2110 clerical/technical staff
  • 109 non-exempt TWU Local 264 maintenance/public safety staff
  • 8 non-exempt SEIU 32BJ residential/maintenance staff

Gender/Age/Racial/Ethnic Composition:

  • 63 percent female, 37 percent male
  • 60 percent are over the age of 40; 40 percent are under the age of 40
  • 45 percent identify as Caucasian; 28 percent identify as African American; 21 percent identify as Latino; and 6 percent identify as Asian American

* These data represent a snapshot of the College staff during the 4th quarter of the fiscal year 2017

Benefits Overview

  • Health Care
  • Prescription Plan
  • Dental Insurance
  • Vision Plan
  • Flexible Spending
  • Disability Insurance
  • Life Insurance
  • Retirement Plans
  • Tuition Assistance

Application & Nomination

Barnard College has retained Spelman Johnson to assist with this search. Review of applications will continue until the position is filled; complete applications received by January 21, 2019 will be assured full consideration. To apply for this position please click on the Apply button, complete the brief application process, and upload your resume and position-specific cover letter. Confidential inquiries and nominations should be directed to Jim Norfleet at jmn@spelmanjohnson.com. Applicants needing reasonable accommodation to participate in the application process should contact Spelman Johnson at 413-529-2895.

Visit the Barnard College website at www.barnard.edu

Barnard College is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Barnard does not discriminate due to race, color, creed, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender and/or gender identity or expression, marital or parental status, national origin, ethnicity, citizenship status, veteran or military status, age, disability, or any other legally protected basis, and to the extent permitted by law. Qualified candidates of diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds are encouraged to apply for vacant positions at all levels.